A discussion on the morality of society

When and where did David Hume live? Mention several of the more important events in his life, and tell how they influenced his writings. Make a list of Hume's published writings in the approximate order in which they appeared. What is meant by his interest in the field of epistemology.

A discussion on the morality of society

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Preliminaries If ethics is widely regarded as the most accessible branch of philosophy, it is so because many of its presuppositions are self-evident or trivial truths: At least for secularists, the attainment of these overall aims is thought to be a condition or prerequisite for a good life.

What we regard as a life worth living depends on the notion we have of our own nature and of the conditions of its fulfillment.

According to Hume, principles of morality are Morality Morality Defined Morality speaks of a system of behavior in regards to standards of right or wrong behavior. The word carries the concepts of:
Relation between Law and Morality or Ethics But the existence of large and heterogeneous societies raises conceptual problems for such a descriptive definition, since there may not be any such society-wide code that is regarded as most important. This is strikingly illustrated by the fact that both C.
Essay Questions Law is an enactment made by the state. It is backed by physical coercion.
Recommended Posts Ancient Greek Philosophy We can start with the Greeks, and this means starting with Homer, a body of texts transmitted first orally and then written down in the seventh century BCE.
Normative definitions of “morality” Nick So, in essence, the only legitimate way to measure of morality of a society is by using the religion or religious-like doctrines, eg humanism that the society itself professes?

This, in turn, is determined, at least in part, by the values and standards of the society we live in. The attainment of these ends can also depend at least in part on external factors, such as health, material prosperity, social status, and even on good looks or sheer luck.

Although these presuppositions may appear to be self-evident, most of the time, human beings are aware of them only implicitly, because many individuals simply lead their lives in accordance with pre-established standards and values that are, under normal circumstances, not objects of reflection.

The historical Socrates was, of course, not the first to question the Greek way of life. Nevertheless, Plato continued to present his investigations as dialogues between Socrates and some partner or partners.

David Hume

And Plato preserved the dialogical form even in those of his late works where Socrates is replaced by a stand-in and where the didactic nature of the presentations is hard to reconcile with the pretense of live discussion.

But these didactic discourses continue to combine questions of ethical, political, social, or psychological importance with metaphysical, methodological and epistemological considerations, and it can be just as hard to assess the extent to which Plato agrees with the pronouncements of his speakers, as it is when the speaker is Socrates.

Furthermore, the fact that a certain problem or its solution is not mentioned in a dialogue does not mean that Plato was unaware of it. There is, therefore, no certainty concerning the question: It stands to reason, however, that he started with the short dialogues that question traditional virtues — courage, justice, moderation, piety.

Morality - What does it mean for a society to be moral? - Christianity Stack Exchange

It also stands to reason that Plato gradually widened the scope of his investigations, by reflecting not only on the social and political conditions of morality, but also on the logical, epistemological, and metaphysical presuppositions of a successful moral theory.

These theoretical reflections often take on a life of their own. The Parmenides, the Theaetetus, and the Sophist deal primarily or exclusively with epistemological and metaphysical problems of a quite general nature. Nevertheless, as witnessed by the Philebus, the Statesman, the Timaeus, and the Laws, Plato never lost interest in the question of what conditions are necessary for a good human life.

Religion and Morality (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

Socrates explores the individual virtues through a discussion with persons who are either representatives of, or claim to be experts on, that virtue. Xenophon Memorabilia I, 10; In the Laches, he discusses courage with two renowned generals of the Peloponnesian war, Laches and Nicias.

Similarly, in the Charmides Socrates addresses—somewhat ironically—the nature of moderation with the two of the Thirty Tyrants, namely the then very young Charmides, an alleged model of modesty, and his guardian and intellectual mentor, Critias.

And in the Gorgias Socrates discusses the nature of rhetoric and its relation to virtue with the most prominent teacher of rhetoric among the sophists.

Finally, in the Meno the question how virtue is acquired is raised by Meno, a disciple of Gorgias, and an ambitious seeker of power, wealth, and fame.

Nor is such confidence unreasonable. These flaws vary greatly in kind and gravity: Socrates shows that enumerations of examples are not sufficient to capture the nature of the thing in question.

Definitions that consist in the replacement of a given concept with a synonym are open to the same objections as the original definition. Definitions may be hopelessly vague or miss the mark entirely, which is to say that they may be either too wide, and include unwanted characteristics or subsets, or too narrow, and exclude essential characteristics.

Moreover, definitions may be incomplete because the object in question does not constitute a unitary phenomenon. Given that the focus in the early dialogues is almost entirely on the exposure of flaws and inconsistencies, one cannot help wondering whether Plato himself knew the answers to his queries, and had some cards up his sleeve that he chose not to play for the time being.

This would presuppose that Plato had not only a clear notion of the nature of the different virtues, but also a positive conception of the good life as such. Since Plato was neither a moral nihilist nor a sceptic, he cannot have regarded moral perplexity aporia as the ultimate end, nor regarded continued mutual examination, Socratico more, as a way of life for everyone.

Perplexity, as is argued in the Meno, is just a wholesome intermediary stage on the way to knowledge Me. But if Plato assumes that the convictions that survive Socratic questioning will eventually coalesce into an account of the good life, then he keeps this expectation to himself.

There is no guarantee that only false convictions are discarded in a Socratic investigation, while true ones are retained. For, promising suggestions are often as mercilessly discarded as their less promising brethren.

It is therefore a matter of conjecture whether Plato himself held any positive views while he composed one aporetic dialogue after the other. He may have regarded his investigations as experimental stages, or have seen each dialogue as an element in a network of approaches that he hoped to eventually integrate.

The evidence that Plato already wanted his readers to draw this very conclusion in his early dialogues is somewhat contradictory, however.

Plato famously pleads for the unity of the virtues in the Protagoras, and seems intent to reduce them all to knowledge.Relation between Law and Morality or Ethics.

A discussion on the morality of society

Law is an enactment made by the state. It is backed by physical coercion. Its breach is punishable by the courts. It . On the other hand, if one accepts a moral theory’s account of moral agents, and the specifications of the conditions under which all moral agents would endorse a code of conduct as a moral code, then one accepts that moral theory’s normative definition of “morality”.

Discussion topics dump: Good Essay Topics. 1. Is cloning good or bad 2. Should abortion be legal? 3.

Should death penalty be abolished 4. Do we follow a fair taxation system? Join the Discussion: No Comments. Free weekly Acton Newsletter. Over at Arc Digital today I take a look at Adam Smith’s moral teachings, particularly in light of commercial society and Christian theology. New Issue of the Journal of Markets & Morality () New Issue of the Journal of Markets & Morality () Comments.

About. Morality impacts our everyday decisions, and those choices are directed by our conscience. Again, we must decide for ourselves where the conscience originates.

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Many people hold to the idea that the conscience is a matter of our hearts, that concepts of right, wrong, and fairness are "programmed" in .

Society has gotten itself confused about what morality is because some groups have made limited lists of behaviors they consider to be .

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